Tuesday, March 27, 2012

I am really excited about this book and it is my hot tip for this summer. We have had vampires and the craze for dystopia is reaching it's peak. I think epic fantasy like this and like Celine Kiernan and Kristin Cashore will be the next big thing in Teen Fiction


http://www.leighbardugo.com/books/

Monday, March 26, 2012

Into The Grey By Celine Kiernan

As well as being a truly frightening ghost story, this book is a beautifully written tale of the connection between family members and in particular the special connection between siblings. The narrative voice is compelling and honest and the terror he feels as his brother is stolen away is palpable. The book is worthy of it's nomination for 2012 CBI awards and I wish the author all the best.



Flick by Geraldine Meade



Flick By Geraldine Meade








The story is told in what feels like a breathless rush or perhaps it was just that I devoured this novel in a day. The voice of Felicity is captured on the page so perfectly the story is raw and real, heartbreaking and up lifting, it makes me want to read everything the author writes in the future. Ger Meade is a talented author. I have one quibble but as it would spoil the ending I won't mention it here, I don't like spoilers. If you have read the book feel free to message me about it. 

Bitterblue


Bitterblue
by Kristin Cashore



I felt like I was waiting forever to read this book and I was lucky enough to get hold of a proof copy so I was able to read it two months before publication. There was so much riding on this book I had loved Graceling and Fire so much, would I be disappointed? I'm happy to say that I wasn't. Although I would have loved to read more about Katsa and Po this was very much Bitterblue's story. Kristin Cashore is a wonderfully talented writer who can create fantastic action sequences and also really explore a character's motivations through dialogue and interaction. Bitterblue is a poignant and subtle novel which charts the growth of girl into a Queen. Bitterblue is a character who always wants to know more, to ask questions and sometimes she opens up old wounds in those around her but she knows she cannot move forward until the past is understood. I really hope that Kristin Cashore continues to write about the beautiful world she has created in her Seven Kingdoms series. She has established herself as a writer of fantasy that is equal to all that has gone before, long may her reign continue.

Sacrilege by S.J. Parris


Sacrilege by S. J. Parris





The latest novel in the Giordano Bruno series is a page turning romp through post reformation England. Perfect for fans of C. J. Sansom it fits into the series by reviving characters from previous stories but also works as a stand alone as the author gives us enough information about Bruno's previous adventures to intrigue the reader without confusing us.
 The story begins in a sweltering London with the threat of plague forcing many to flee. Bruno is unexpectedly reunited with Sophia now on the run and wanted for her husband's murder. He travels to Canterbury to attempt to clear her name and to spy on the city's luminaries. Here Bruno uncovers strange plots and sinister secrets and finds himself on trial. 
 I hadn't read any books by S. J. Parris before but found Sacrilege an entertaining and enjoyable read and look forward to reading the rest of the series.

Thursday, March 8, 2012


The Good Father by Noah Hawley


Reviewed by Lisa Redmond
 A heartfelt and beautifully written novel, The Good Father examines the relationship between Paul Allen and his son Daniel alternating their stories in the aftermath of Daniel’s shooting of a Presidential candidate many saw as a symbol of hope.
Comparisons with We Need to Talk about Kevin will be inevitable as The Good Father deals with a parent trying to comprehend how their child could have become a killer, but written from the point of view of a father questioning his parenting skills Noah Hawley gives the age old question of nature versus nurture a fresh angle.
Paul is a rheumatologist, the doctor of last resort for many, for him diagnosis is about investigation. Inevitably as Paul tries to comprehend the choices Daniel has made he begins to compile a file examining Daniel’s life and reading about previous political assassinations he concludes that Daniel must be innocent.
We are also given an insight into Daniel’s mind as he drifts through life feeling disconnected.
This is a novel about family, love and the decisions we make. Well written, thrilling and compelling. I highly recommend it.
This review originally appeared in U Magazine